Physical Therapy for Your Business

Physical Therapy for Your Business

Recently I hurt my knee, devastating for a dancer. I got an MRI and found out I tore both menisci and a ligament. So I started going to physical therapy. Some of the physical therapy work is on specific things for my knee, tracking of the knee over the toes for good alignment, exercises for flexibility of the knee, building up the strength of the small muscles that surround the knee and knee cap. But most of the work is general strengthening, not only of the knee but of the back, interior pelvic muscles, quad and hamstring muscles, ankle and foot. Why am I telling you all this?

In your business, everything is related. Just like your body and leg. If your knee or your marketing (for instance) is broken, it affects everything else. Yes, you have to look at specific things like your marketing activities. But you also have to look at strengthening your general business outlook such as how you handle time management, your mindset, your decision making abilities, your vision and values. You need to strengthen these things continually so that your business systems flourish. Things like marketing activities, sales conversions, budgeting, staff management don’t happen in a vacuum. They are all connected like the back to the hip to the knee to the ankle to the foot. Together they create a strong balanced environment. They grow together and support each other. Are you growing your mindset, your possibility thinking, your positivity? Are you opening your mind to seek new opportunities? Are you creating repeatable systems that offer some predictability? Are you focused on your vision and adhering to your values? Are the specifics written into a business plan to make sure that what you’re doing actually leads you to the goals you seek? Are your systems measuring what’s working and what’s not so you can make changes that yield better results? If you were going to prescribe physical therapy for your business, what would you do to yield better success?

But then, that begs the questions, why do people like me call what I do business coaching? Why don’t we call it business therapy? What are your thoughts?

Jeri Quinn
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Jeri Quinn from Driving Improved Results is an executive coach, management consultant, speaker and author who focuses on communication in her work with executives and companies. She is the author of The Customer Loyalty Playbook, 12 Game Strategies to Drive Improved Results in Your Business. With more than 40 years as a serial entrepreneur.



Quinn has worked with executives and teams in over 40 industries, spoken at major business expos including New York City’s Javits Center, facilitated business development and extraordinary customer service at institutions such as MoMA and AIG, and has partnered with New York City, The Kauffman Foundation, Citibank, Merrill Lynch, HSBC, and Signature Bank to educate their clients.



She can be reached at:
jeri@DrivingImprovedResults.com
www.DrivingImprovedResults.com
www.CustomerLoyaltyPlaybook.com


Jeri Quinn

Jeri Quinn from Driving Improved Results is an executive coach, management consultant, speaker and author who focuses on communication in her work with executives and companies. She is the author of The Customer Loyalty Playbook, 12 Game Strategies to Drive Improved Results in Your Business. With more than 40 years as a serial entrepreneur.

Quinn has worked with executives and teams in over 40 industries, spoken at major business expos including New York City’s Javits Center, facilitated business development and extraordinary customer service at institutions such as MoMA and AIG, and has partnered with New York City, The Kauffman Foundation, Citibank, Merrill Lynch, HSBC, and Signature Bank to educate their clients.

She can be reached at:
jeri@DrivingImprovedResults.com
www.DrivingImprovedResults.com
www.CustomerLoyaltyPlaybook.com

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2 comments

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  • Leanne Hoagland-Smith July 6, 2010

    Great advice, reminds me of Michael Gerber’s E Myth with so many people working in their business and not investing the time to work ON their businesses.

  • Jeri Quinn July 6, 2010

    Leanne,

    It’s so true. Working ON your business sets up the strategy that helps all the interconnected parts move in unison, which creates real forward progress. Devoting time and energy to strategy can pay off big time through leveraging opportunities, making better decisions and saving resources. (time and money). How right you are! Thanks for your comment.

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